The Do’s & Don’ts of Boyband Comebacks

When boybands reform, a reinvention of a non-musical instrument-playing group that has resonated with a deluge of dedicated followers is resurrected under an entirely new form. Backstreet Boys, New Kids on the Block and Take That are all core collectives of the thriving boyband phenomenon of the 1990s who regenerated themselves resulting in a bombardment of comeback projects with a new wave of newness. A new album, a new tour, a new image – paint a picture of a nostalgic throwback rebranding as a new band to become the comeback kings. Brit pop exports One Direction, The Wanted and South Korean successes BTS are also bouncing back into the boyband fad under a youthful glare.

In the high hopes that One Direction do come back from their longer than intended hiatus and lucrative solo careers, here are some do’s and don’ts steps to comeback success.

Source: Modest Management

New era, new style, new concept. But DO keep core identity
Double denim, co-ordinate suits and crisp white outfits should be a fashion fad of boyband past, with designer label items, outspoken tailored trousers and retro vintage T-shirts being the statement making sense of style presently dominating the lacking gap in the music market with the absence of an unprecedented young male ensemble painfully profound.  Evolving into a new era of style and concept while keeping core ethics, identity and band beliefs intact can prove turbulent in a tough industry. Seamlessly developing a sense of maturity in keeping with original origins of a group everyone once knew and loved, The X Factor-formed four-piece One Direction developed a dedicated following of fans whom support the solo successes still, and with the pop sound prevailing from debut album Up All Night to the latest Made In The A.M LP a developing factor featured throughout the once five fragments’ convoluted career is their individualised growth in garments. From glam rocker Harry Styles’ monstrous mauve footwear to Gucci geared tailor made suit moniker and Mullingar man Niall Horan’s brash baggy denim jeans to smart casual debonair shirts, spiralling into a new style and sound is a significant DO in boyband revivals.

Cheesy comeback singles are outrageously outdated (a DON’T)
Singles that install that sense of welcoming and warmness while weeping bubblegum pop “I want” and “Living for the moment” monotonous lyrics and a bland backing of acoustic guitar strums and the steady beats of a drum are not what the 21st Century boyband comeback should represent. Wow factor, justified legitimacy and complete divergence deems what a comeback song should sound like and puts the likes of the weepy, weak and wearisome O Town’s 2014 effort ‘Skydive’ to a shambolic shame and should be a thing of the past just like its corny synchronised choreography counterpart.

Source: Heatworld

Supergroups are NOT the solution to a sabbatical’s termination
Supergroups, the secondary solution to a hiatus termination where a stand alone band brandished themselves not strong enough to sustain an impressive comeback. Formulating a fantastical gathering of music moguls manufactured to make quick money, attempt to fuse a faculty of fanbases and distribute a momentous turn in music, supergroups are the equation of a “Potent but short lived rock phenomenon” states Time magazine. Time-wasting, tedious and trifling as the two-year time frame supergroup McBusted an allegiance of British bands McFly and Busted demonstrated, yet remunerative and money-reaping shouts the sold out nationwide tours and Top 10 charting debut album McBusted meticulously established in the short stint as a supergroup, a successful short term solution but most definitely NOT a long term fulfilment, as evidenced by McFly’s fans furiously stating their hatred for the pop-rock major ensemble.

Source: @Truman_Black (Twitter)

Social media marketing hypes up the hardcore super fans and mainstream media. But don’t kill your own comeback
Boosting brand awareness, connecting with a core clientele and placing a perception on the marketplace. Social media marketing mulls over major factors that frequently help or hinder an artist’s online presence particularly marketing a magnificent comeback, online promotion plays a penultimate part in promoting to prestige super fans and media in real time. Taking the route to reinvention requires precision within planning, and hyping a brand is the best and worst ways to welcome back a beloved boyband or in this absolutely DO NOT case, Manchester-based band The 1975.

Killing your own hype is not a good look, persistently publishing posts regarding brief enquiries into online relationships without no content or context as to your enquiry, suffocates your supporters into a wave of over-promotion, a dangerous game when social media marketing.

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